How to Speak Like A Kiwi

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The Kiwi accent is unique. While many people from overseas might say it’s the same as the Australian accent, you’ll find that they’re actually quite different if you listen closely enough (and don’t ask a Kiwi if they’re Australian–they don’t like that :)). One of the most common and classic ways you can tell is by having them say “fish and chips”. An Aussie would tell you “feesh and cheeps” whereas a Kiwi would say “fush and chups”. This flattening of the vowel is very distinguished in New Zealand and is what makes it different from pretty much every other English-speaking country.

Generally their A’s (as in catch) sound more like eh, the E’s more like ee, and the I’s (as in fish) sound more like u. Also, the “ay” sound (as in bay) are more like ai (bai) and certain I sounds (as in “mice”) are more like oi (moice). Here are some more examples:

The short a as in “back” sounds like “behck”.
The a in words like “day” sound more like “die”.
The e in words like “went” sound more like “weent”.
The short i as in “kids” sounds like “kuds”.
The i in words like “ice” sounds like “oice”.

So the sentence “Today, Ben went to the backyard to see if the kids wanted some ice” actually sounds more like “To die, Been weent to the behck yahd to see uff the kuds wantud some oice.”

Another key feature of the Kiwi accent, like the Australians, the British, the South Africans, and people from Boston, is that they pronounce their R’s differently than in Canada and most of America. It’s much softer and sounds more like “ah” than the typical American pirate “arrrr”. So yard actually sounds more like “yahd”.

Also, similar to Canadian English, New Zealanders tend to end their sentences with a rising intonation–almost as if asking a question–so their speech sound cheerful and friendly. And like Canadians they say “eh” at the end of a question, only it sounds more like “aye”.

As an American I didn’t really find the Kiwi accent too difficult to understand, but sometimes found it amusing to listen to. Like that awkward moment when a Kiwi asks you to paint their deck (deeck). Or another time while hanging up some clothes on the laundry line at a hostel I used to work at, someone asked me to get some more pegs (clothes-pins in the US). What I heard was “cen you please go geet me some pigs?”!

Last but not least, you’ll need to know some of the vocabulary that is especially unique to New Zealand. Here are some common words and phrases I’ve heard:

Sweet As – Common expression meaning “great!” or “awesome!” You can also replace “sweet” with other adjectives like “cheap as” to mean “it’s very cheap!” or “cold as” to mean “it’s very cold!”
Bach – Pronounced “batch”. Means a vacation home or cabin
Boot – The trunk of a car
Brekkie – Breakfast
Capsicum – Bell pepper
Chiller – Refrigerator
Chilly bin – Cooler; ice chest
Choice – Nice
Cuppa – Refers to a cup of coffee or tea
The Dairy – Convenience store
Fizzy drink – Soda or pop
Good on ya! – Congrats or well done!
Heaps – A lot
Hoover – Vacuum cleaner
Hokey Pokey – A quintessential NZ treat that consists of bits of honeycomb toffee and vanilla ice cream.
Jandal – Abbreviation for “Japanese sandal”, or what Americans and British people call flip flops
Kai – Maori for “food”
Kia Ora – Common Maori expression for “hello”
Lemonade – Very different from American lemonade as it refers to drinks like 7UP and Sprite.
Mate – Friend
Rubbish – Trash; garbage
Stag Party – Bachelor party
Sunnies – Sunglasses
Tramping – Hiking
The Wop Wops – Out in the middle of nowhere
Ta – Maori for “Thank you”
Ute – Truck
Zed – The letter “Zee” in America is pronounced “Zed” in NZ (or as the Kiwis say, N Zed).
Yeah nah – I’m not sure exactly what this one means, but I think it’s basically a nice way of saying no.

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